Guide to Hiring in Australia

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Guide to Hiring in Australia

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A country with a strong and diverse economy, Australia boasts plenty of opportunities for businesses to succeed. However, it is crucial to understand the legal and regulatory requirements for your business to run compliantly.

Our Australia Hiring Guide covers key topics such as work permits, working hours, statutory paid annual leaves, discrimination laws and more. Take a read through our detailed guide and keep tabs on the latest labour law updates to get you started on building a successful business in Australia!

Please note that all the information listed below are to be used as a general guideline. For more detailed accounts of Australia’s employment laws and regulations, please visit the official governmental websites.

Labour Law – Basics

What are the basic requirements for employers in Australia?

  • Other than taking into account of minimum wages, discrimination laws and workplace safety measures, there are other considerations Australian employers must be aware of to run a compliant business:
    • Australian Business Number (ABN) – this is an 11-digit number issued upon company registration that is used to identify the business to the government and community. This number will also be used in important documents pertaining to employees such as pay slips.
    • Pay As You Go (PAYG) Withholding Tax – under this system, employers must hold an amount from employees for tax purposes and submit it to the Australian Tax Office. The amount must cover the employees’ income tax, any Study and training support loans (STSL) payments and the Medicare (healthcare) levy.
    • Payroll Tax – this is paid on a regional/state level and is calculated based on the total wages a company pays out each month. Each region/state has its own threshold – find out if your business should declare payroll in the ‘Reference Links’ section at the bottom of this page.
    • Superannuation – also known as ‘super’, superannuation is a retirement pension benefits fund which employers will contribute to. It is mandatory for employers to contribute for all eligible employees, including contractors and workers under 18. A new employee can be allowed to choose which ‘super’ fund they would like the money to go into.

 

Australia implemented some key changes as of 1 July 2023:

  • The high income threshold rises for unfair dismissal cases will rise to $167,500 annually and the compensation limit will be $83,750 for dismissals occurring on or after 1 July 2023.
  • The filing fee for unfair dismissal, general protections, bullying, and sexual harassment at work applications will increase to $83.30.
  • A 5.75% increase in minimum award wages.
  • The minimum superannuation guarantee percentage will increase to 11%.
  • An updated Fair Work Information Statement (FWIS) for the start of the new financial year.

 

What is the different work permits and visas in Australia?

Australia has several work permits catered for applicants from various skillsets and industries. Below is the complete list found on the Australian immigration website.

VisaDescription
Business Innovation and Investment (permanent) visa (subclass 888)For entrepreneurs, investors, and business owners to continue their activity in Australia
Business Innovation and Investment (provisional) visa (subclass 188)Allows visa holders to own and manage a business, conduct business and investment activity, or undertake an entrepreneurial activity in Australia
Business Owner (subclass 90)For those who want to own and manage a business in Australia. It allows visa holders to live in Australia on a permanent basis
Global Talent Visa (subclass 858)Permanent visa for people who have an internationally recognised record of exceptional and outstanding achievement in an eligible field
Employer Nomination Scheme (subclass 186)Allows skilled workers, who are nominated by their employer, live and work in Australia permanently
Investor visa (subclass 891)For those who want to conduct business and investment activities in Australia. It allows visa holders to live in Australia permanently
Permanent Residence (Skilled Regional) visa (subclass 191)Allows workers who have a valid visa and meet an income requirement to live and work in Australia permanently. It comes in two streams – the regional provisional stream (for those who have lived and worked in regional areas of Australia) and the Hong Kong stream (for Hong Kong or British National (Overseas) passport holders who have shown commitment to Australia)
Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (subclass 187)Allows skilled workers who are nominated by their employer in regional Australia to permanently live and work in Australia
Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 494)Allows regional employers to sponsor and hire skilled workers to address labour shortages where employers are unable to source appropriately skilled Australian workers
Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190)Allows skilled workers who have been nominated to live and work in Australia as permanent residents
Skilled-Recognised Graduate visa (subclass 476)Allows recent engineering graduates to live, work or study in Australia for up to 18 months. Applicants must have completed a degree or received a higher qualification from a specified institution within the last 2 years and be under 31 years of age
Skilled Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 489)Allows skilled workers to live and work in regional Australia. Successful applicants can bring their families to live with them and may later be eligible to apply for the Skilled Regional (Permanent) visa (subclass 887)
Skilled Regional visa (subclass 887)For people who have lived and worked in specified areas of regional Australia on a previous, eligible visa
Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 491)For skilled workers who have been nominated by a state or territory government to live and work in regional Australia
State or Territory Sponsored Business Owner visa (subclass 892)For those who own and manage a business in Australia. Visa holders can stay in Australia indefinitely. To apply as a primary applicant, you must have a qualifying visa granted on a particular basis
State or Territory Sponsored Investor visa (subclass 893)Permanent resident visa for subclass State/Territory Sponsored Investor (Provisional) visa (subclass 165) holders and who have held a designated investment of AUD750,000 for 4 years
Temporary Activity visa (subclass 408)Allows visa holders to do specific types of work on a short-term, temporary basis in Australia such as for government-endorsed events, sports, and religious work.
Temporary Graduate visa (subclass 485)Temporary visa that allows international students to live, study and work after finishing their studies
Temporary Work (International Relations) visa (subclass 403)Temporary visa to work in specific circumstances that improve Australia’s international relations
Temporary Work (Short Stay Specialist) visa (subclass 400)Can be granted for up to 6 months. Applicants must possess highly specialised skills, knowledge or experience that can help Australian businesses and can’t reasonably be found in Australia
Temporary Skill Shortage visa (subclass 482)Allows an employer to sponsor a suitably skilled worker to fill a position that they can’t find a suitably skilled Australian to fill

 

What to note for existing employees?

  • Employees must continue to declare their income tax each year on the myGov portal. Tax rates vary between Australian residents and non-residents. Who is classified as a ‘resident’ depends on various factors such as:
    • where they are domiciled (permanently live)
    • whether they live in the country for at least 183 days (50% of the year)
    • if they are an Australian working at an Australian post overseas and a member of a government superannuation scheme

Residents will need to declare income they earn all over the world, while non-residents only have to declare income earned in Australia. The income tax rates for 2022-2023 for both residents and non-residents are as follows:

Residents

Taxable incomeTax on this income
0 – $18,200Nil
$18,201 – $45,00019 cents for each $ over $18,200
$45,000 – $120,000$5,092 plus 32.5 cents for each $ over $45,000
$120,001 – $180,000$29,467 plus 37 cents for each $ over $120,000
$180,001 and over$51,667 plus 45 cents for each $ over $180,000

Source: Australian Taxation Office


Non-residents 

Taxable incomeTax on this income
0 – $120,00032.5 cents for each $1
$120,001 – $180,000$39,000 plus 37 cents for each $1 over $120,000
$180,001 and over$61,200 plus 45 cents for each $ over $180,000

Source: Australian Taxation Office

In terms of bonuses, the law does not make it compulsory for employers to give them any. However, if an employment contract states that bonuses will be given each year, employees may have a right to claim the bonus payment.

 

What to remember when hiring new employees?

  • Important documents to have in order when hiring a new employee include:
    • Pay As You Go (PAYG) Withholding Tax (refer to the ‘What are the basic requirements for employers in Australia?’ section)
    • Payroll Tax – if applicable (refer to the ‘What are the basic requirements for employers in Australia?’ section)
    • Superannuation payments (refer to the ‘What are the basic requirements for employers in Australia?’ section)
    • Mandatory insurance payments such as the Workers Compensation Insurance (refer to the ‘Is employment insurance mandatory in Australia?’ section)

 

What are the different discrimination laws in Australia?

  • Australia has enacted several legislations to protect against discrimination, such as the:
    • Racial Discrimination Act 1975 – makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person because of their race, colour, descent, national origin or ethnic origin, or immigrant status.
    • Sex Discrimination Act 1984 – makes sexual harassment and discrimination based on sex and gender, sexual orientation, marital/relationship status, and pregnancy unlawful.
    • Disability Discrimination Act 1992 – makes it unlawful to discriminate someone based on their disability, and it covers people who have temporary and permanent disabilities; physical, intellectual, sensory, neurological, learning and psychosocial disabilities, diseases or illnesses, physical disfigurement, medical conditions, and work-related injuries. The law also extends to disabilities that people have had in the past and potential future disabilities, as well as disabilities that people are assumed to have.
    • Age Discrimination Act 2004 – makes it unlawful for someone to not be given the same opportunities as others based on their age, and to harass or bully another person because of his or her age. This applies to young and older workers, as well as to recruitment processes organised through recruitment/employment agencies.
    • Fair Work Legislation Amendment (Secure Jobs, Better Pay) Act 2022 – passed on December 6th 2022, this Act lists amendments made to the main piece of legislation, the Fair Work Act 2009. These amendments cover pay rates and secrecy, gender equality, sexual harassment, and flexible working arrangements – to name a few.

The laws against discrimination listed above do not only apply during employment, but even for job advertisements and during the recruitment and selection process.

The Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 lists out the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC)’s roles and responsibilities in ensuring compliance with the laws above. The AHRC is a statutory authority that is tasked with investigating complaints on discrimination and human rights breaches.

Note: The laws mentioned above are federal-level laws. Each territory/region may have their own laws that overlap with federal laws.

What are the working hours in Australia?

  • The standard work week in Australia runs from Monday through Friday, while the regular working hours in a week for most companies are 38 hours a week – or 7.6 hours a day.Extra hours may be subject to overtime payments; however, employers can ask employees to work additional hours that are reasonable. Employees may refuse to work additional hours that are unreasonable.According to Australia’s Fair Work website, as to what constitutes reasonable/unreasonable additional hours, the following factors are usually taken into consideration:
    • risks to employee health and safety
    • employee’s personal circumstances, including family responsibilities
    • needs of the workplace or enterprise
    • whether the employee is entitled to receive overtime payments, penalty rates or other compensation
    • any notice given by the employer to work the additional hours
    • any notice given by the employee of his or her intention to refuse to work the additional hours
    • usual patterns of work in the industry
    • nature of the employee’s role and the employee’s level of responsibility
    • whether the additional hours are in accordance with averaging provisions included in an award or agreement that is applicable to the employee, or an averaging arrangement agreed to by an employer and an award/agreement-free employee
    • other relevant matters

 

What is the legal probation period in Australia?

  • In Australia, a probation period can range from 3-6 months – starting from the first day of employment.

In terms of entitlement, employees who are on probation must be treated the same way as employees who are not. Employees who are hired on a full-time or part-time basis are to be given access to annual leave and sick leave even while on probation.

In the case an employee does not pass probation, they are still entitled to receive notice when the employment ends and receive payment for unused annual leave.

For more information, refer to the ‘Relevant Links’ section below.

 

What are the minimum wage requirements in Australia?

  • Australia’s national minimum wage stands at AU$23.23 per hour (or AU$882.80 for a standard 38-hour work week). This applies to all regions in the country. Casual employees who are only hired as and when needed will receive casual loading – an additional payment on top of the minimum wage, given that they do not receive the same entitlements as permanent employees such as paid annual leave. Currently, the casual loading rate is 25%. More information on Australia’s minimum wage in the ‘Reference Links’ section below.

 

 

Termination of Employment – Employment Insurance, Tax, Severance Payment & Long Service Payment

  • An employee’s term of service may come to an end for various reasons such as resignation, termination by employer, redundancy, and so on. Other than the case of a resignation where the employee notifies the employer, in all other instances, the employer must notify the employee that his/her employment will be terminated.Employers can allow employees to work through the notice period, or to issue a payout to them (pay in lieu of notice).Employees who are terminated may receive a lump-sum payment within 12 months of being terminated. This payment can be taxed by the government.Other payments that an employee would be entitled to upon termination of employment include:
    • any outstanding wages or other remuneration still owing
    • any pay in lieu of notice of termination
    • any accrued annual leave and long service leave entitlements
    • the balance of any time off instead of overtime that the employee has accrued but not yet taken
    • any redundancy pay or entitlements if the employee has been made redundant and is eligible

Some of the payments listed may be included in the lump-sum payment mentioned above and therefore may be taxed.

In the case of redundancy, an employee who has worked for at least a year for a company that has 15 or more employees may be entitled to a redundancy/severance payment of 16 weeks’ salary.

 

What is the retirement age in Australia?

  • There is no mandatory retirement age in Australia. Instead, those planning to retire should consider when they can be eligible for the Age Pension:
    • 65 years and 6 months, if you were born between 1 July 1952 and 31 December 1953.
    • 66 years, if you were born between 1 January 1954 and 30 June 1955.
    • 66 years and 6 months, if you were born between 1 July 1955 and 31 December 1956.

Starting from 1 July 2023, the Age Pension age will be 67 years for those born on or after 1 January 1957.

Retirees will also be able to access their superannuation – known as ‘super’ – which is a retirement pension benefits fund that employers contribute to. Retirees must also reach their ‘preservation age’ to be able to get their ‘super’ funds.

Super Guarantee Percentage:

PeriodGeneral super guarantee (%)Super guarantee (%) for Norfolk Island (transitional rate) (from 1 July 2016)
1 July 2002 – 30 June 20139.000
1 July 2013 – 30 June 20149.250
1 July 2014 – 30 June 20159.500
1 July 2015 – 30 June 20169.500
1 July 2016 – 30 June 20179.501
1 July 2017 – 30 June 20189.502
1 July 2018 – 30 June 20199.503
1 July 2019 – 30 June 20209.504
1 July 2020 – 30 June 20219.505
1 July 2021 – 30 June 202210.006
1 July 2022 – 30 June 202310.507
1 July 2023 – 30 June 202411.0088
1 July 2024 – 30 June 202511.509
1 July 2025 – 30 June 202612.0010
1 July 2026 – 30 June 202712.0011
1 July 2027 – 30 June 2028 and onwards12.0012

Source: Australian Government – Australian Taxation Office

Employment dispute channels

  • Employees in Australia who have workplace disputes can seek solutions through the following state-level tribunals/courts:
    • South Australian Employment Tribunal
    • Western Australian Industrial Relations Commission
    • Industrial Magistrates Court of Western Australia
    • Tasmanian Industrial Commission
    • NSW Industrial Relations Commission
    • The Queensland Industrial Relations Commission. Decisions from this Commission can be appealed to the Industrial Court of Queensland

 

Is employment insurance compulsory in Australia?

  • Australia makes it mandatory for employers to provide employees with Workers Compensation Insurance. This insurance protects workers if they suffer a work-related injury or disease. Coverage must be purchased for every state and territory where the employer has workers. Premiums vary between each state and depend on the employee’s pay and industry. Non-mandatory employment insurance include healthcare, life and disability, and long-term disability. However, most employers still cover these types of insurance.

 

Labour Law - Leave

  • Both full-time and part-time workers across all regions in Australia are eligible for 4 weeks for annual leave for every 12 months they have worked. Full-time employees will receive paid leave of up to 152 hours, while part-time workers will get paid leave on a pro-rata basis – depending on the number of hours worked.The leave will begin accumulating from the first day of employment, and employees are allowed to take leave as soon as they accumulate it.
  • In Australia, employees are given paid sick leave and carer’s leave. Both come under the same entitlement – the former is for when the employee is unable to work due to an injury, illness or even stress, while the latter is for when the employee has care for/support a family member who is unwell/facing an emergency.Paid sick leave and carer’s leave applies to all employees except casual employees. While full-time employees get 10 days per year, this amount is pro-rated for part-time employees.Under the law, there is no minimum or maximum amount of sick leave/carer’s leave that can be taken at a single time. Employees, however, may be requested to provide evidence when applying for this leave.
  • Australia doesn’t specifically have maternity leave or paternity leave. Instead, the general term ‘parental leave’ is used. Parents who take parental leave receive payments for the duration of the leave, as shown below:

Parental Leave Pay for a child born or adopted before 1 July 2023

    • Payment is given for up to 18 weeks
    • The one receiving the pay must be the child’s primary carer
    • To be eligible, the parent must pass the income test and the work test
    • The parent cannot work during the Paid Parental Leave period, except for in certain circumstances
    • If the child is a newborn, the parent must have registered or applied to register the child’s birth the state or territory birth registry

Parental Leave Pay for a child born or adopted from 1 July 2023

    • Payment is given for up to 100 days or 20 weeks
    • Must be caring for a child born or adopted after 1 July 2023
    • To be eligible, the parent must pass the income test and the work test
    • The parent cannot work during the Paid Parental Leave period, except for in certain circumstances
    • If the child is a newborn, the parent must have registered or applied to register the child’s birth the state or territory birth registry
  • For children born or adopted before 1 July 2023, fathers will be able to receive payments while being on paternity leave for 2 weeks – known as the ‘Dad and Partner Pay. To qualify, the following criteria must be met:
    • care for a newborn or newly adopted child
    • meet the income and work tests
    • not be working or taking paid leave during the Dad and Partner Pay period, except for in certain circumstances
    • If the child is a newborn, the parent must have registered or applied to register the child’s birth the state or territory birth registry

The Dad and Partner Pay system will be changing effective 1 July 2023. For children born or adopted from that date onwards, fathers may be able to claim Parental Leave Pay (similar to mothers). The eligibility requirements will also be similar.

  • There are 8 statutory holidays that apply to all regions in Australia each year, namely: New Year’s Day, Australia Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Anzac Day, King’s Birthday, Christmas Day and Boxing Day.
  • Adhering to the standard 38-hour work week (except for in certain circumstances), the maximum working hours in a week are 9 am to 5 pm, Monday to Friday, with a 30 to 60-minute lunch break. Any amount that exceeds this may cause employer to incur a penalty.

For employees that are hired under an industrial agreement:

    • Full-time employees working between 7 to 10 hours a day are entitled to 2 paid rest breaks of 10 minutesand one unpaid meal break of 30-60 minutes.
    • Employees are also entitled to a minimum break of 12 hours between shifts, but it can be agreed between employer and employee to reduce the break to 10-12 hours.

What are the public holidays in Australia?

Australia Public Holidays 2024

  • Australian Capital Territory
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1 January
Australia Day26 January
Canberra Day11 March
Good Friday29 March
Easter Saturday30 March
Easter Sunday31 March
Easter Monday1 April
Anzac Day25 April
Reconciliation Day27 May
Sovereign’s Birthday10 June
Labour Day7 October
Christmas Day25 December
Boxing Day26 December

 

  • New South Wales
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1 January
Australia Day26 January
Good Friday29 March
Easter Saturday30 March
Easter Sunday31 March
Easter Monday1 April
Anzac Day25 April
King’s Birthday10 June
Labour Day7 October
Christmas Day25 December
Boxing Day26 December

 

  • Northern Territory
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1 January
Australia Day26 January
Good Friday29 March
Easter Saturday30 March
Easter Sunday31 March
Easter Monday1 April
Anzac Day25 April
May Day6 May
June Public Holiday10 June
Picnic Day5 August
Christmas Eve24 December (from 7pm to midnight)
Christmas Day25 December
Boxing Day26 December
New Year’s Eve31 December (from 7pm to midnight)

 

  • Queensland
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1 January
Australia Day26 January
Good Friday29 March
The Day after Good Friday30 March
Easter Sunday31 March
Easter Monday1 April
Anzac Day25 April
Labour Day6 May
Royal Queensland Show (Brisbane area only)14 August
King’s Birthday7 October
Christmas Eve24 December (from 6pm to midnight)
Christmas Day25 December
Boxing Day26 December

 

  • South Australia
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1  January
Australia Day26 January
Adelaide Cup Day (subject to proclamation)11 March
Good Friday29 March
Easter Saturday30 March
Easter Monday1 April
Anzac Day25 April
King’s Birthday10 June
Labour Day7 October
Christmas Eve24 December (from 7pm to midnight)
Christmas Day25 December
Proclamation Day public holiday / Boxing Day26 December
New Year’s Eve31 December (from 7pm to midnight)

 

  • Tasmania
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1 January
Australia Day26 January
Eight Hours Day11 March
Good Friday29 March
Easter Monday1 April
Easter Tuesday2 April (Generally Tasmanian Public Service only)
Anzac Day25 April
King’s Birthday10 June
Recreation Day4 November (Areas of the state that don’t observe Royal Hobart Regatta)
Christmas Day25 December

 

  • Victoria
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1 January
Australia Day26 January
Labour Day11 March
Good Friday29 March
Saturday before Easter Sunday30 March
Easter Sunday31 March
Easter Monday1 April
Anzac Day25 April
King’s Birthday10 June
Friday Before AFL Grand Final[TBC]
Melbourne Cup5 November
Christmas Day25 December
Boxing Day26 December

 

  • Western Australia
HolidayDate
New Year’s Day1 January
Australia Day26 January
Labour Day4 March
Good Friday29 March
Easter Sunday31 March
Easter Monday1 April
Anzac Day25 April
Western Australia Day3 June
King’s Birthday23 September (some regional areas in WA hold the King’s Birthday public holiday on a different date)
Christmas Day25 December
Boxing Day26 December

For a complete list of regional holidays within each state, refer to the ‘Reference Links’ section below.

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In the meantime, stay updated on Labour Law updates throughout the year through our Labour Law Insider. For more news and insights into the market, make sure to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss out on the latest HR news, or contact our team to learn more about the latest changes!

*Please note that all the information listed above are to be used as a general guideline. For more detailed accounts of Australia’s employment laws and regulations, please visit the official governmental websites.

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Relevant Links:

  • Tax – Pay As You Go (PAYG) Withholding
    • Register for PAYG Withholding – https://business.gov.au/registrations/register-for- taxes/register-for-pay-as-you-go-payg-withholding
    • What to Know About PAYG Withholding – https://www.ato.gov.au/Business/PAYG-withholding/
  • Tax – Payroll Tax
    • How Payroll Tax Works – https://business.gov.au/finance/taxation/payroll-tax
  • Superannuation:
    • Setting Up ‘super’ For Your Business: https://www.ato.gov.au/business/super-for-employers/setting-up-super-for-your-business/
    • Super Guarantee:https://www.ato.gov.au/Rates/Key-superannuation-rates-and-thresholds/?=redirected_SuperRate&anchor=Superguaranteepercentage#Superguaranteepercentage
  • Work Permits and Visas in Australia:
    • Business Innovation and Investment (permanent) visa (subclass 888) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/business-innovation-and-investment-888/
    • Business Innovation and Investment (provisional) visa (subclass 188) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/business-innovation-and-investment-188
    • Business Owner (subclass 890) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/business-owner-890
    • Global Talent visa (subclass 858) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/global-talent-visa-858
    • Employer Nomination Scheme (subclass 186) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/employer-nomination-scheme-186
    • Investor visa (subclass 891) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/investor-891
    • Permanent Residence (Skilled Regional) visa (subclass 191) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-regional-191
    • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (subclass 187) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/regional-sponsor-migration-scheme-187
    • Skilled Employer Sponsored Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 494) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-employer-sponsored-regional-494
    • Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-nominated-190
    • Skilled-Recognised Graduate visa (subclass 476) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-recognition-graduate-476
    • Skilled Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 489) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-regional-provisional-489
    • Skilled Regional visa (subclass 887) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-regional-887
    • Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 491) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-work-regional-provisional-491
    • State or Territory Sponsored Business Owner visa (subclass 892) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/state-or-territory-sponsored-business-owner-892
    • State or Territory Sponsored Investor visa (subclass 893) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/state-or-territory-sponsored-investor-893
    • Temporary Activity visa (subclass 408) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-activity-408
    • Temporary Graduate visa (subclass 485) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-graduate-485/
    • Temporary Work (International Relations) visa (subclass 403) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-work-403
    • Temporary Work (Short Stay Specialist) visa (subclass 400) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-work-400
    • Temporary Skill Shortage visa (subclass 482) – https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-skill-shortage-482
  • Discrimination Laws in Australia:
    • Racial Discrimination Act 1975 – https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/employers/racial-discrimination
    • Sex Discrimination Act 1984 – https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/employers/sex-discrimination
    • Disability Discrimination Act 1992 – https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/employers/disability-discrimination
    • Age Discrimination Act 2004 – https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/employers/age-discrimination
    • Fair Work Legislation Amendment (Secure Jobs, Better Pay) Act 2022 – https://www.fairwork.gov.au/newsroom/news/secure-jobs-better-pay-changes-to-australian-workplace-laws
    • Fair Work Act 2009 – https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C2009A00028
    • Australian Human Rights Commission Act 1986 – https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00030
  • Working Hours in Australia:
    • Maximum Weekly Hours – https://www.fairwork.gov.au/tools-and-resources/fact-sheets/minimum-workplace-entitlements/maximum-weekly-hours
  • Probation Period in Australia:
    • Information on Probation Periods – https://www.fairwork.gov.au/tools-and-resources/fact-sheets/minimum-workplace-entitlements/maximum-weekly-hours
  • Minimum Wage in Australia:
    • Fact Sheet on Minimum Wages – https://www.fairwork.gov.au/tools-and-resources/fact-sheets/minimum-workplace-entitlements/minimum-wages
  • Termination of Employment:
    • Employee Termination Payments – https://www.ato.gov.au/Individuals/Jobs-and-employment-types/working-as-an-employee/leaving-your-job/employment-termination-payments/
  • Employment Insurance in Australia:
    • Workers’ Compensation Insurance Rates – https://www.finder.com.au/business-insurance/workers-compensation-insurance
  • Statutory Maternity Leave:
    • Income Test for Parental Leave Pay (for child born/adopted before 1 July 2023) – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/meeting-income-test-for-parental-leave-pay-for-child-born-or-adopted-before-1-july-2023?context=64475
    • Work Test for Parental Leave Pay (for child born/adopted before 1 July 2023) – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/meeting-work-test-for-parental-leave-pay-for-child-born-or-adopted-before-1-july-2023?context=64475
    • Income Test for Parental Leave Pay (for child born/adopted from 1 July 2023) – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/meeting-income-test-for-parental-leave-pay-for-child-born-or-adopted-from-1-july-2023?context=64479
    • Work Test for Parental Leave Pay (for child born/adopted from 1 July 2023) – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/meeting-work-test-for-parental-leave-pay-for-child-born-or-adopted-from-1-july-2023?context=64479
    • More Information on Parental Leave Pay – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/parental-leave-pay
  • Statutory Paternity Leave:
    • Income Test for Dad and Partner Pay – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/meeting-income-test-for-dad-and-partner-pay?context=22136
    • Work Test for Dad and Partner Pay – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/meeting-income-test-for-dad-and-partner-pay?context=22136
    • More information on Dad and Partner Pay – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/dad-and-partner-pay
    • Information on New Parental Leave Pay – https://www.servicesaustralia.gov.au/parental-leave-pay-for-child-born-or-adopted-from-1-july-2023
  • Public Holidays in Australia:
    • Full List of Public Holidays in 2023 – https://www.australia.gov.au/public-holidays